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You Get To Help Pick The New Flag That Will Represent Columbia

Jun 20, 2017

After more than 100 years, Columbia is getting a new flag (yes, the city has a flag).


Out with the old corn-and-cotton flag, in a with a new banner to “represent the people and culture of our great city and serve as a unique icon of Columbia that all citizens can be proud to fly,” said Lee Snelgrove, director of One Columbia for Arts and History, which is spearheading the crowd-sourced flag quest with the Columbia Design League.


More than 540 flag concepts were received from the public. They’ve been narrowed down to 19 finalists, which people can now comment on online at www.colaflag.org.


Public input will be considered until July 10, at which point a panel of stakeholders and design experts will make a final design selection.


The creator of the winning flag design will be awarded a $2,000 prize.

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 Columbia’s current city flag, featuring corn, cotton and the city seal. The star represents Columbia as the capital of South Carolina. The crescent ties into the state flag. The blue nods to the state flag and the rivers. The three lines represent Columbia’s three rivers. The crescent represents the fact Columbia as capital city. A blue stripe to represent each river. Red represents the red clay of the Midlands. Blue represents the three rivers that come together near her heart. The star represents Columbia as the capital city. The three lines represent the three rivers that conjoin in Columbia. The star represents Columbia as the state capital of South Carolina. Set on a green field representing the city’s greenways, three rivers flow through it while it is all bathed by a “famously hot” sun. The flag paints a picture of the region itself. Blue lines represent the intersection of three rivers. On the eastern bank lies the capital city, the garnet star. Blue represents education and the stars represent the 6 major colleges in Columbia. The star represents Columbia as the state capital. The crescent ties into the state flag. The three lines represent the three rivers that conjoin in Columbia. Blue stripes represent the Broad and Saluda rivers becoming the Congaree. The garnet stripes honors USC’s presence in Columbia. The crescent is emblematic of South Carolina and has ties to the colonial history of both the state and the capital city. The three bars represent the three rivers. A star represents the capital. The dark blue pays homage to the state flag. Three abstract waveforms represent the three rivers. The jagged orange shape ties into the tagline “famously hot,” as well as the historical significance of Sherman’s burning of Columbia during the civil war. The star represents Columbia as the state capital. Six stars represent those on the State House. Indigo blue is a reference to the S.C. flag. Green represents Fort Jackson. The Columbia canal and railroads are represented by the middle space. The three blue lines represent the rivers. The six stars are the stars on the State House where it was damaged in the Civil War. The star represents the city as the state capital. The interwoven lines shows how Columbia is between the mountains and beach and how the rivers merge in Columbia. Green represents the forests that helped us win the Revolutionary War and orange represents the Sandhills region that runs through Columbia. Columbia is known for its river systems (blue lines) and warm climate (yellow sun). White stars represent the stars on the State House and endurance, and the blue represents the importance of water transportation in Columbia’s history. Columbia’s current city flag, featuring corn, cotton and the city seal. The star represents Columbia as the capital of South Carolina. The crescent ties into the state flag.

The star represents Columbia as the capital of South Carolina. The crescent ties into the state flag. Columbia Design League and One Columbia Provided photo